Retirement Benefits

1. Discuss the legal requirements involved in retirement benefits including the content and responsibilities of the employee retirement income security act.
In 1974, an employee retirement income security act (ERISA) was enacted in the US. The act was enacted due to the widespread criticism of the existing pension plans. The retirement benefit was bound by a number of legal requirements for the smooth running of the subsequent plans. The purpose of the act was to ensure that private pension plans met the set minimum standards to avoid their failure and also required the plans to periodically provide participants with the information about the retirement pension plans such as funding, benefit accrual amounts and vesting. The scheme also gave participants the rights to file lawsuits against those who violated the laws.
The retirement plans in the US were bound by a number of laws that had to be followed. First of all, the employees could not be coaxed to retire at a given age. This was in line with the 1986 amendment to the age discrimination in employment act (ADEA). The other legal requirement of the retirement benefit plans was that the “normal retirement” in many employers was supposed to be the age at which an employee could retire and receive full pension benefits. However, many retirement benefits were to provide for early retirement that allowed workers to retire before the normal retirement age of 65 years. There were also phased retirements that acted as alternatives used by firms where employees were allowed to bridge between the time for working or retiring full time as they offered the firm the chance to have their skill and knowledge expertise at the workplace.
Another amendment that is the older workers benefit protection act (OWBPA) was enacted in the year 1990 to the ADEA that required for equal treatment for the elder workers in their early retirements or on severance situations. The amendment also set specific standards that had to be met if the older workers were to sign exceptions promising not to sue the firm for age discrimination in the exchange for the severance benefits.
The health sector was not left behind in providing care to the retirees and the workforce. This led to the enactment of the Patient protection and affordable care act (PPACA) to provide for the significant altering of the employers in the process of providing essential benefits. The act had a number of provisions that included the requirement for most individuals in the US to maintain essential coverage or pay a penalty. It also required those companies that had more than 50 employees working for more than 30 hours a week to offer their employees a health care benefit or risk paying a penalty. The act also was instrumental in extending the dependent age to 26 years. The act also restricted insurance companies from setting up rates based on the health status of an individual or the medical condition of a person among other health-related factors. Finally, the act also provided for state-run health care exchanges where insurance companies were obliged with offering competitive health plans among other requirements.
2. Discuss how benefits impact human resource management.
Employee benefits are non-wage compensation that is offered by the employer to the employees as an addition to their normal wages or salaries. The benefits may include, health insurance, vocational leaves, retirement benefits, disability income protection among others. Although the benefits may be expensive to the employer, there exist many human resource management related benefits that the employer benefits from the provisions.
First, the benefits help the employer find and retain his highly qualified staffs who continue providing their services to the firm. The benefits also help the employer in handling high-risk coverage at low costs that help in reducing the company’s financial burden. These benefits also help improve the output of the company because the employees are more effective since they are assured of their job security. The premiums are also tax deductible as the company’s expenses thus helping the organization to save.
On the side of the employees, the benefits have a variety of advantages as the employees get a peace of mind which leads to increased productivity and satisfaction due to the assurance of protection of themselves and also their families. This will help motivate the employees to work more and improve the output that the company is producing. Also, the employees will not be afraid of job loss as the company has assured them thus they will be able to deliver their best.
The benefits also help those employees with personal life and disability to be protected by offering income replacement in case of serious illness or disability. This is because some workers who are disabled tend to suffer from illnesses regularly thus skipping job days. The benefits will allow the employees to have a piece of mind as they are paid even in the event of absenteeism and when on duty they can work effectively. The employees also are able to feel a sense of pride of their employer when contented with the benefits they get. This sense of pride helps the employees to have a sense of belonging to the organization and can work better than when the employees feel that they are doing something that they are pushed to do. Work that is done better when the employees feel as part of the work than when they are forced to work as the employees seem not to be willing to work.

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The lady of Auxerre
The Louvre monograph media was used to give a journalistic allure to the artifact. This artifact was sculptured and built in an old sculpture where it was sculptured bearing the traces of the polychrome decoration that was common with the Greeks in the 7th century (Donohue, 23). It is also important to note that the Louvre monograph media, as well as its sculptural nature made of yellow limestone with Greek decorations as seen in the Sculpture images used, was a typical one as it was the only way that the artifact would have been identified and brought to the people.
The sculpture has been assigned by researchers of being from the Crete because of the draping characteristic of her gown as well as due to the limestone she is made of. Tools such as the chisels, riffles as well as rasps have been used to streamline the artifact so as to give it a finer look. The face of the lady appears to be triangular in shape despite half of her face having fallen and therefore this brings the elements of geometric technique in sculpturing it. Also, the shape of her body shows that the carving technique was used predominantly as some materials in her body seems to have been removed and other material added. Another technique applied in this sculpture is the lost wax bronze casting which involved pouring hot metal wax to create the fine body shape as well as her hair.
According to Shuster and George, it is believed that the primary purpose of the creation of the lady of Auxerre artifact was to resemble the Greek goddess and served as a votary instead of a virgin goddess Persephore (p65). The object was not able to serve the purpose as it acted as a votary instead of its original purpose of resembling the virgin goddess Persephore. The lady of Auxerre sculpture was found in the storeroom of the Auxerre Museum. This artifact is believed to have been created in the 17 century by an unknown individual and later brought to light by in the year 1907 by Maxime Collignon.
Today the sculpture is found at the Louvre museum in Paris something that alters its original purpose of acting as a Greek goddess. Today it can only be viewed under lighted galleries where one is not expected to touch it or even worship it. Therefore, this makes the original, and current conditions that it is viewed at the Louvre museum differ significantly as it is opposed to the religious purposes of the sculpture. Also, the meaning it served as a votary varies with the way it is viewed from far where one cannot even have a good look at it to see a sample of a healthy skin like in the ancient times.
In conclusion, it is important to note that this artifact was such an exciting artwork as it not only captured the cultural lives of the people then but also their religious aspect of life. This is different from the earlier sculptures as it makes use of a number of sculpturing techniques to come up with a finer artifact. This artwork has is really important as it used different sculpturing as compared to the earlier artifacts thus coming up with a finer sculpture.

Works Cited
Donohue, A A. Greek Sculpture and the Problem of Description. Cambridge UP, 2005.
Sculpture, I. Statuette of a Woman, Called the Lady of Auxerre. n.d..
Shuster, George N. The World’s Great Catholic Literature. Halcyon House, 1947.

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Cement and Concrete Production

Abstract
Despite concrete and cement being significant materials that continue to fulfill housing and infrastructural activities all around the world in the construction of buildings, bridges, roads, as well as other structures, sustainability is vital to the well-being of our planet. In the year 2006, manufacturing of cement rose to a total of 2.55 billion tons, and this value is anticipated to rise to 3.744 billion tons by the year 2050 (Agbeyangi, 2012). Therefore, it is crucial for us to realize the toxic effects that cement and concrete production pose to our environment. Thus, this aspect of recognizing the dangers of cement and concrete production brings out the purpose of this study as researching how cement and concrete production contributes to the pollution of our environment and find thus look for alternate methods of producing it to reduce the harmful effects of its production. A demonstration of these results would be through utilizing statistical analysis to project into the future of cement and concrete production as well as determine an estimate of the potential reduction of carbon IV oxide emission.
Introduction
This research paper is aimed at determining the current trends in cement and concrete production while applying strategies to reduce carbon IV Oxide emissions.
Cement and concrete production as one of the major carbon emitters whose emission is responsible for the pollution of the environment, its production is, therefore, one of the destructive environmental products to produce. Cement is composed of calcium silicates that require the heating of limestone in addition to other ingredients at high temperatures. According to the U.S Environmental Protection Agency, this heat is placed at 2,640 degrees Fahrenheit of burning fossil fuels and greenhouse gas pollution. Therefore, cement and concrete production results to the emission of approximately one ton of Carbon IV oxide to the atmosphere despite the increased Cement production annually at the rate of 5%, and has also turned to be the second highest utilized material globally after water (Agbeyangi, 2012).
Cement & Concrete Production
Cement and concrete are two distinct materials with different procedures of creation. For cement, it is a powder mix that is made from limestone and clay/shale. The mixture is heated in kilns that are made of inclined long rotating cylinders made of steel that may go up to a length of 180 meters and have a 6-meter diameter (Kurdowski, 2014). The mixture is put through the cylinder’s high head, and then it moves along the kiln’s length slowly due to its continuous rotation and inclination. Fuel is injected and burned at the low head of the kiln to produce the heat needed for the reaction of the two materials to take place. Depending on the length of the cylinder, the mixture may take up to 2 hours passing through the kiln. The kiln produces marble-sized pieces referred to as a clinker, which is a mixture of four compounds (Kurdowski, 2014). Cooling, grinding and mixing of the clinker with a little amount of gypsum that controls the setting to give out the Portland cement is carried out.
Calcium, silicon, aluminum, iron and other ingredients are chemically combined to produce cement whereby, Calcium and Silicon make up 90% of the cement mix. Additionally, gypsum is added to control the setting time that is whether the reaction is to take place quickly or slowly. Therefore, regarding the cement chemical composition, there are five chemical compositions namely;
i. TriCalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5) that makes up 50% of the cement chemical composition and also determines the concretes new strength.
ii. DiCalcium silicate (Ca2SiO4) makes up 25%, and it is the one that defines the concretes long-term power.
iii. Tricalcium Aluminate (Ca3Al2O6 ) and TriCalcium Aluminoferrite (Ca4Al2Fe2O10) that both makeups 10% each of the cement chemical composition, but Tricalcium Aluminoferrite reacts least as compared to TriCalcium Aluminate.
iv. Lastly, Gypsum weighted at 5% is added as a catalyst to control the setting time.

More calcium silicate hydrate forms upon the provision of “seeds” through the formation of Calcium Hydroxide and Calcium Silicate Hydrate crystals that grow thicker, thus make it hard for unhydrated TriCalcium silicate to be reached by water. The rate at which the molecules diffuse through the calcium silicate hydrate lining is what controls the reaction’s speed. This lining grows over time thus slowing the production of Calcium silicate hydrate (Kurdowski, 2014).
The difference between the material composition of cement and concrete is a significant matter that needs to be considered. For cement, it is primarily a component in the production of concrete whose fundamental ingredients contain Portland cement, water, and a mixture of sand and rock or gravel that is commonly referred to as aggregate (Newman & Choo, 2003). Since cement is frequently processed inform of powder, upon being mixed with water, it acts as a binding agent thus merging both water and cement to form a paste that binds the aggregate. After the combination, the water is what makes the concrete to harden while the roughening of concrete occurs in a process referred to as hydration. Therefore, hydration is a reaction whereby the significant components in cement form chemical bonds with water molecules to give rise to hydrates or hydration products (Newman & Choo, 2003). Thus, water is the primary factor associated with the strength in concrete as a result of the water to cement ration used during the production which is the combination of lbs compared with the overall quantity of cement. The final concrete performance is determined by the water and cement ratio and has a scale of highest to lowest thus, the smaller the water and cement ratio, the stronger the concrete and vice versa (Agbeyangi, 2012).

References
Agbeyangi, D. (2012). Utilising Ash In Concrete Production: The Use Of Wood Waste Ash As An Additive To Cement In Concrete Production. Saarbrücken: LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing.
Kurdowski, W. (2014). Cement and concrete chemistry.
Newman, J., & Choo, B. S. (2003). Advanced concrete technology: [v. 1]. Oxford, England: Butterworth-Heinemann.

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Name:
Professor’s Name
Course:
Date:
Witches’ of Loaves
The short story Witches’ Loaves by O. Henry appears to be a simple story that involves an old lady who is involved in running a bakery as well as an old gentleman who always buys two loaves of stale bread as well as what happens when Miss Martha Meacham’s act of kindness backfires. The act of kindness is after the lady happens to want the man’s attention by putting butter in the stale bread without the knowledge that the man does not eat the meals but instead uses them as a rubber in his architectural works.
Miss Martha Meacham, a forty-year-old lady, is the main character of this story, and as stated earlier, she runs a bakery. It is noted that Miss Martha possessed two false teeth and was characterized by a compassionate heart. She was also single but still has the hope of some love connection, and when she meets a man with a German accent who comes to her bakery regularly and asks for only two loaves of stale bread, she starts to see a possibility of starting a relationship with him. Martha starts thinking about how to know more about this gentleman, and by noticing his stained fingers, she concludes that he might be an artist and therefore hangs up a painting for him to attract his attention. She also opts to dress well as well as apply makeups so as she could attract prettiest for this man. Luckily, she achieves her motive as the gentleman briefly talks about the painting but does not seem to notice the efforts of Miss Martha getting his attention.
The themes that Miss Martha portrays in the story are the themes of loneliness, independence, embarrassment, desperation, escape love, defeat as well as connection. The central theme happens to be that of loneliness as Miss Martha lives and works for herself with her sole engagement to the rest of the world being through her bakery. This shows that Martha is lonely and this becomes proved when she starts liking the gentleman who comes to buy stale bread at her bakery. The exciting thing about Martha’s liking for this man is her nature of making assumptions and acting on the assumptions that may not be correct. This is because she assumes that the two loaves of stale bread that the gentleman buys daily are always meant for him to eat, and she goes forward to even applying butter on the loaves without the man’s knowledge so that he could see how she is caring and in turn fall for her. Her actions go to the contrary side as the man comes the next day mad at her for destroying his drawings.
She also assumes that the man may be an artist just because he comments on a painting that she leaves on her shelves and that her fingers look stained. This is what makes us see the loneliness in Martha that makes her make all these assumptions as she seems so desperate for the man as she even thinks about the man regularly more than any other customer. She is continuously motivated by the man, and she is so passionate about pursuing a relationship with him.
Miss Martha’s traits as well as her advancement towards the gentleman aids in developing the vital theme of defeat in the story as at the end of the tale Martha realizes that Blumberger misunderstood her and she, therefore, retreats to her shell. This theme of defeat is noticeable as Martha abandons her homemade cosmetics that she had been using all through to gain the attention of the gentleman. She ends up realizing that she committed a mistake and instead of her progress with her goal of getting Blumberger, the defeat makes her embarrassed.
It becomes clear that Miss Martha’s assumptions mislead her and instead of her proceeding to forgiving herself and moving on with life, she happens to take the criticism towards her by Blumberger to her heart. Also, since Blumberger is just a stranger to Miss Martha, she is not supposed to allow his ill blame towards her for her generosity mistakes affect her permanently. Also, the theme of defeat is strengthened in the short story as one is not sure whether the embarrassment that Miss Martha goes through will seclude her from the rest of the world, limit her chances of getting involved in any other courtship affair as well as shatter her confidence.

Works Cited
Henry, O. The Complete Writings of O. Henry [pseud.]. Doubleday, Page and Co, 1917.

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School of Science
COSC2531 Programming Fundamentals
Assignment 3
Assessment Type: Individual assignment; no group work.
Submit online via Canvas → Assignments → Assignment 3.
Marks awarded for meeting requirements as closely as possible.
Clarifications/updates may be made via announcements/relevant discussion forums.
Due date: end of Week 14; The deadline will not change.
Please check Canvas → Assignments → Assignment 3 for the most up to date information.
As this is a major assignment, a university standard late penalty of 10% per each working day applies for up to 5
working days late, unless special consideration has been granted.
Weighting: 30 marks out of 100
1. Overview
The main objective of this assignment is to familiarize you with program design and implementation
for solving a non-trivial problem. You are to solve the problem by designing a number of code
snippets, methods, classes and associating them towards a common goal. If you have questions,
ask via the relevant Canvas discussion forums in a general manner.
2. Assessment Criteria
This assessment will determine your ability to:
1. Follow coding, convention and behavioral requirements provided in this document and in the
lessons.
2. Independently solve a problem by using programming concepts taught in this course.
3. Write and debug Java code independently.
4. Document code.
5. Ability to provide references where due.
6. Meeting deadlines.
7. Create a program by recalling concepts taught in class, understanding and applying concepts
relevant to solution, analysing components of the problem, evaluating different approaches.
3. Learning Outcomes
This assessment is relevant to the following Learning Outcomes:
1. Analyse computing problems.
2. Devise suitable algorithmic solutions and code these algorithmic solutions in JAVA.
3. Develop maintainable and reusable solutions using the modular or object oriented paradigm.
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4. Assessment details
MySchool is a Java application for schools. It reads data from files. IMPORTANT: you should
change data in these files to verify your program. We will use different files during marking.
Section 1: PASS Level
At this level, your program can read from a file specified in command line and store student scores in
a 2D integer array. You may define methods wherever appropriate to support the functionalities.
scores.txt
34 C081 C082 C083 C084
S2023 99 75 85 62
S2025 -1 92 67 52
S1909 100 83 45 -1
The file stores data as a text table shown above. Data fields are separated by spaces and new lines.
The first row contains course IDs and the first column contains student IDs. The first field in the data,
the top left corner, shows the number of rows and the number of columns in one integer. For
example ‘34’, the first digit 3 means there are 3 students in this table. The second digit 4 means
there are 4 courses. You can assume that the total number of courses will never be more than 9.
The table stores every student’s final results in those courses. Results are all integers. A result ‘-1’
means not enrolled in that course. A ‘0’ means the student did enrol but failed to receive any mark.
Your program can find the student with the highest average score and display on the command line:
> java MySchool scores.txt
> The top student is S2023 with an average 80
Section 2: CREDIT Level — You must ONLY attempt this level after you complete the PASS level
Your program can read one more file which stores the information of courses offered by the school.
Info includes course ID, course title and credit points. You can assume all courses of the school
appear in this file and in the first file (student results file). There is no duplicate or redundant courses.
courses.txt
C081 Mathematics 12
C082 Science 12
C083 English 24
C084 Technologies 6
At this level your program can produce a text file named as course_report.txt.
> java MySchool scores.txt courses.txt
> The top student is S2023 with an average 80
> courses_report.txt generated!
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Given the above courses.txt, course_report.txt should look like below. The fourth column is
the number of enrolled students. The fifth column is the average score of each course.
C081 Mathematics 12 2 99
C082 Science 12 3 83
C083 English 24 3 65
C084 Technologies 6 2 57
Section 3: DI Level — You must ONLY attempt this level after you complete the CREDIT level
A this level, your program can read one more file from command line. That file stores information
about students, that includes student ID, name (no space between first name and last name, but an
underscore) and age. You can assume all students appear in this file as well as in the first file
(student results file). There is no duplicate records or empty records.
students.txt
S2023 Sue_Vaneer 14
S2025 Robin_Smith 13
S1909 Barry_Banks 15
At this level your program can produce a text file report named as student_report.txt.
> java MySchool scores.txt courses.txt students.txt
> The top student is S2023 with an average 80
> course_report.txt generated!
> student_report.txt generated!
Given the above students.txt, student_report.txt should look like below. The fourth
column is the number of courses that student enrolled im. The fifth column is the average GPA. A
course result of 80+ receives 4 GPA points. A result of 70-79 receives 3 points. A result in between
60-69 is 2 points. 50-59 gets 1 points. Under 50 has 0 points. For example Sue Vaneer has 2 HD, 1
DI and 1 CR. So her GPA is ( 4 x 2 + 3 + 2 ) / 4 = 3.25.
S2023 Sue_Vaneer 14 4 3.25
S2025 Robin_Smith 13 3 2.33
S1909 Barry_Banks 15 3 2.66
At this level, your program can handle some variations in the files.
(1) characters in sources.txt will be treated as -1.
(2) decimal numbers will be treated as integers, ignoring the decimal part, e.g 99.5 -> 99
(3) The order of lines in both students.txt and courses.txt does not matter. (You can
assume that the order of columns does not change.)
scores.txt students.txt
34 C081 C082 C083 C084 S1909 Barry_Banks 15
S2023 99.5 75 85 62 S2025 Robin_Smith 13
S2025 x 92 67 52 S2023 Sue_Vaneer 14
S1909 100 83.2 45 abc
[Hint] You may find exception useful.
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Section 4: HD Level — You must ONLY attempt this level after you complete the DI level
A this level, your program achieves the above requirements in OO style with at least three classes,
School, Student and Course. Design the appropriate instance variables, constructor(s) and
methods for these classes. Class related info should be encapsulated inside of these classes.
In addition, student_report.txt generated at this level is more advanced, taking credit points of
each course into consideration. See below. The fourth column is now the total credit points that the
student has completed. For example Sue Vaneer, she has done all four courses, so she earned 12 +
12 + 24 + 6 = 54 credit points. The fifth column is the adjusted GPA. So that for Sue is (4 x 12 + 3 x
12 + 4 x 24 + 2 x 6 ) / 54 = 3.55, which is more accurate than that in the DI level.
S2023 Sue_Vaneer 14 54 3.55
S2025 Robin_Smith 13 42 2.42
S1909 Barry_Banks 15 48 2.0
Section 5: Miscellaneous
To verify the calculations, you can import the files, especial the provided test files, into a spreadsheet
tool, e.g. Excel, Google Spreadsheet, Numbers, which can easily compute average, max etc.
You program may have no interaction with users during execution. Simply run the code, read the
files, display output and/or generate file(s).
You can assume user always type file names in the right order in command line, e.g. score file first,
then course file, then student file. However it is possible that file is missing or cannot be found.
Your program should quite gracefully in these circumstances.
5. Referencing guidelines
What: This is an individual assignment and all submitted contents must be your own. If you have
used sources of information other than the contents directly under Canvas→Modules, you must give
acknowledge the sources and give references using IEEE referencing style.
Where: Add a code comment near the work to be referenced and include the reference in the IEEE
style.
How: To generate a valid IEEE style reference, please use the citethisforme tool if unfamiliar with this
style. Add the detailed reference before any relevant code (within code comments).
6. Submission format
Submit one file ProgFunAssignment3.zip, which is the zipped file of all your java file, via
Canvas→Assignments→Assignment 3. It is the responsibility of the student to correctly submit their
files. Please verify that your submission is correctly submitted by downloading what you have
submitted to see if the files include the correct contents.
1. Your final code submission should be clean, neat, and well-formatted (e.g., consistent
indentations) and abide by the formatting guidelines.
2. Identifiers should be named properly and camel case e.g. UsedCar (class) and carPrice
(variable). [Google “camel case”]
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3. You must include adequate meaningful code-level comments in your program.
4. IMPORTANT: your code should be able to compile and run under command-line.
7. Academic integrity and plagiarism (standard warning)
Academic integrity is about honest presentation of your academic work. It means acknowledging the
work of others while developing your own insights, knowledge and ideas. You should take extreme
care that you have:
• Acknowledged words, data, diagrams, models, frameworks and/or ideas of others you have
quoted (i.e. directly copied), summarised, paraphrased, discussed or mentioned in your
assessment through the appropriate referencing methods,
• Provided a reference list of the publication details so your reader can locate the source if
necessary. This includes material taken from Internet sites.
If you do not acknowledge the sources of your material, you may be accused of plagiarism because
you have passed off the work and ideas of another person without appropriate referencing, as if they
were your own.
RMIT University treats plagiarism as a very serious offence constituting misconduct. Plagiarism
covers a variety of inappropriate behaviours, including:
• Failure to properly document a source
• Copyright material from the internet or databases
• Collusion between students
For further information on our policies and procedures, please refer to the University website.
8. Assessment declaration
When you submit work electronically, you agree to the assessment declaration.
Code must be compiled under command line with no error,
> javac MySchool.java
and runnable under command line
> java MySchool scores.txt courses.txt students.txt
Submission failed to compile would receive heavy mark deduction.
Rubric
Assessment Task Marks
PASS Level 15 marks
CREDIT Level 3 marks
DI Level 3 marks
HD Level 6.5 marks
Others
Code quality and style; proper use of
methods & arguments; good comments
2.5 marks

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Unit Information: SIT772 Database and Information Retrieval
Trimester: 2020 T1
Assessment 2: Information Retrieval Techniques Problem Solving Task
This document supplies the detailed information on assessment tasks for this unit.
Key information
• Due: Week 12-Sunday, 7 June 2020, 23:59 (AEST)
• Weighting: 30%
• Submit: Through CloudDeakin
Learning Outcomes
This assessment assesses the following Unit Learning Outcomes (ULO) and related Graduate
Learning Outcomes (GLO):
Unit Learning Outcome (ULO) Graduate Learning Outcome (GLO)
ULO 5: Demonstrate data retrieval skills in the
context of a data processing system.
GLO 1: Discipline-specific knowledge and
capabilities
Purpose
This task evaluates the student’s technical skills in the management of unstructured data, with
potential usage in real applications. This assessment supports student understandings of the
techniques related to unstructured data management and data processing
Instructions and Submission Guide
This is an individual assessment task. Students are required to submit ONE written report.
• Read these instructions and the following questions.
• ONE written report with the name as using student ID_givenname_A2.pdf, e.g.,
123456_Kevin_A2.pdf
• The report must be submitted via CloudDeakin assessment portal. The wrong
submission venue or the wrong submitted file may lead to the penalty.
Question 1 (Index Construction): [8 Marks]
Suppose you have joined a search engine development team to design a search algorithm based
on both the Vector model and the Boolean model.
You have collected the following documents (unstructured) and plan to apply an index
technique to convert them into an inverted index.
Doc 1:data science is field to use scientific method, process, algorithm, system to extract
knowledge.
Doc 2:data mining is the process to discover pattern in large data to involve method at the
database system.
Doc 3:information system is the study of network of hardware and software that people use
to process data.
To answer the below questions, you have to provide the detailed procedures step by step.
You need to remove all stop words and punctuation before the process of creating the inverted
index. After that, please complete the following steps:
Question 1.1: [2 Marks]
Create a merged inverted list including the within-document frequencies for each term.
Question 1.2: [2 Marks]
Use the index created as above to create a dictionary and the related posting file.
Question 1.3: [2 Marks]
Please design three Boolean queries, (for example, web AND search) and list the relevant
documents for each query. Each query must contain at least two keywords while no one
keyword appears in one document only.
Question 1.4: [2 Marks]
Please use the Vector model to query on the inverted index, and compare the result with the
Boolean model. (Hint: you can use cosine similarity and set a similarity threshold).
Question 2 (IR Evaluation): [15 Marks]
In this question, you are required to evaluate the performance of different search engines.
• First, please select two of the three search engines you are familiar,
https://www.google.com.au/, https://www.bing.com/?cc=au, https://au.yahoo.com/.
Figure 1: Select the search engine located in Australia
• Second, you are required to constrain your query to www.reuters.com by specifying:
e.g., Given a keyword query “high-tech global”, you need to write into the search box
with “high-tech global site:www.reuters.com” at your selected search engine website.
Below is the example provided for you to use google, shown in Figure 2 and Figure 3.
[Penalty is applied if your results do not follow the instruction.]
Figure 2: Search “high-tech global” within the website www.reuters.com
Figure 3: Search Results of “high-tech global” within the website www.reuters.com
• Third, please choose one target from the following list, and design two queries to search
in both search engines. So both query 1 and query 2 have to be tested in both search
engines.
 Target 1: Online tutors have more incomes in worldwide education marketing.
 Target 2: Online education expanding, awaits innovation.
 Target 3: Innovations in online learning for regional people.
• Finally, select the first 20 results in both search engines, if they return the target news,
then mark them as relevant documents, otherwise, they are irrelevant. Note: assume
there are 12 relevant documents in total (retrieved and not-retrieved). If you search
more than 12 relevant documents, you can simply regard some to be irrelevant for
practice.
The following questions are based on your search results.
Question 2.1: [3 Marks]
List your target, results and designed search queries (You can use any keywords you think are
related to the target news, even if the keywords are not contained the news text). For each
result, you can click the link and go to the page, and write down a summary with 2~3 sentences
for each result if you think this result is relevant. At your report, you are required to provide
the URL address and the summary to explain why they are relevant to the queries.
Question 2.2: [3 Marks]
Get the precision and recall values for 20 documents for query 1 in search engine 1. Interpolate
them to 11 standard recall levels. Then plot them into a chart. Get the precision and recall
values for 20 documents for query 1 in search engine 2. Interpolate them to 11 standard recall
levels. Then plot them into the same chart.
Question 2.3: [3 Marks]
Get the precision and recall values for 20 documents for query 2 in search engine 1. Interpolate
them to 11 standard recall levels. Then plot them into a chart. Get the precision and recall
values for 20 documents for query 2 in search engine 2. Interpolate them to 11 standard recall
levels. Then plot them into the same chart.
Question 2.4: [3 Marks]
Now find the average interpolated precision of query 1 and query 2 for search engine 1 and
plot it into a chart. So you will have total of 3 interpolated curves in one single chart. Now find
the average interpolated precision of query 1 and query 2 for search engine 2 and plot it into
the same chart. So, you will have total of 3 interpolated curves in one single chart.
Question 2.5: [3 Marks]
Plot the average interpolated values for Search Engine 1 and Search Engine 2 on one single
chart, and compare the algorithms in terms of precision and recall. Which search engine do you
think is superior? Why?
Question 3 (Innovation Concept Design of Decentralized Web Search Engine): [7 Marks]
In this question, you are required to make the great brainstorming for concept design. As we
learnt, all the current web search engine companies host the web data in their own web server.
The data generators cannot control their own data. In the near future, it might be highly
desirable for the worldwide researchers or companies to design a new type of web search
engine, denoted as decentralized or distributed web search engine. Lots of start-ups also make
investment in such area. The benefit is to achieve data privacy protection, data use
transparency, and removing the centralization of data management.
[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distributed_search_engine,
https://www.quora.com/Do-you-know-any-decentralized-search-engine,
https://gadget.co.za/web-gets-decentralised/].
Example: Decentralized Internet Project.
https://coins.newbium.com/post/16998-decentralized-internet-project-cardstack
In this challenging task, your design should include several important aspects:
Question 3.1: [2 Marks]
How to maintain the data using index? Must have 200~300 words to describe the design.
Question 3.2: [2 Mark]
Question 3.2. How to answer keyword queries in the new types of data environment? Must
have 200~300 words to describe the design.
Question 3.3: [1 Mark]
Question 3.3. How to evaluate such new web search engine system? Must have 200~300 words
to describe the design.
Question 3.4: [2 Marks]
Question 3.4. Provide the system structure concept design diagram. Must have a diagram and
200~300 words to explain the diagram.
Assessment feedback
General feedback to the class will be provided via CloudDeakin-Discussion Forum. The formal
assessment feedback will be released with the marks in CloudDeakin altogether.
Extension requests
Requests for extensions should be made to Unit/Campus Chairs 3 days early before the
assessment due date. Unit Chair: Jianxin Li, Jianxin.li@deakin.edu.au
Special consideration
You may be eligible for special consideration if circumstances beyond your control prevent
you from undertaking or completing an assessment task at the scheduled time.
See the following link for advice on the application process:
http://www.deakin.edu.au/students/studying/assessment-and-results/special-consideration
Assessment feedback
Detailed written feedback will be provided within two weeks of submission.
Referencing
You must correctly use Harvard referencing in this assessment. See the Deakin referencing
guide.
Academic integrity, plagiarism and collusion
Plagiarism and collusion constitute extremely serious breaches of academic integrity. They are
forms of cheating, and severe penalties are associated with them, including cancellation of
marks for a specific assignment, for a specific unit or even exclusion from the course. If you
are ever in doubt about how to properly use and cite a source of information refer to the
referencing site above.
Plagiarism occurs when a student passes off as the student’s own work, or copies without
acknowledgement as to its authorship, the work of any other person or resubmits their own
work from a previous assessment task.
Collusion occurs when a student obtains the agreement of another person for a fraudulent
purpose, with the intent of obtaining an advantage in submitting an assignment or other work.
Work submitted may be reproduced and/or communicated by the university for the purpose of
assuring academic integrity of submissions: https://www.deakin.edu.au/students/studysupport/referencing/academic-integrity

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CSE 368 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence – Summer 2020
Assignment 1 – Solving sliding problem using uniformed search
Due Date: Sunday, June 9, 11:59pm
1 Assignment Overview
The goal of the assignment is to solve a sliding problem using uniformed search algorithms.
Part 1 [45 points] – Solve the problem using breadth-first search (BFS)
Part 2 [45 points] – Solve the problem using depth-first search (DFS)
Report [10 points] – Show your results interpretation
2 Deliverable
There are two parts in your submission (unless they are combined into Jupyter notebook):
• Report
Report can be done, either as a pdf or directly in Jupyter notebook. In your report:
– Describe the difference between BFS/DFS
– Show your results after applying both approaches to solve the sliding problem
– List the sequence of actions that each of the algorithms took
– Write explanation of your results
– Show the time it took each of the algorithms to solve the problem
• Code
The code of your implementations. Code in Python is the only accepted one for this project. You can
submit the code in Jupyter Notebook or Python script. You can submit multiple files, but they all
need to have a clear naming.
3 Submission
To submit your work, add your pdf, ipynb/python script to zip file Y OUR_UBIT_assignment1.zip (e.g.
avereshc_assignemtn1.zip) and upload it to UBlearns (Assignments section). After finishing the project
grading, you may be asked to demonstrate it to the instructor if your results and reasoning in your report
are not clear enough.
4 Important Information
This assignment is done individually. The standing policy of the Department is that all students involved in
an academic integrity violation (e.g. plagiarism in any way, shape, or form) will receive an F grade.
5 Important Dates
June 9, Tue, 11:59pm – Assignment 1 is Due
1

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CSE2DBF 2020
Assignment 2 (20%)
Due date: 10.00am Friday, June 5th 2020
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:
✓ to perform queries on a relational database system using SQL;
✓ to demonstrate an advanced knowledge of stored procedures, stored functions and triggers.
This is an individual Assignment. You are not permitted to work as a group when writing this
assignment.
Copying, Plagiarism: Plagiarism is the submission of somebody else’s work in a manner that gives
the impression that the work is your own. The Department of Computer Science and Information
Technology treats plagiarism very seriously. When it is detected, penalties are strictly imposed.
Students are referred to the Department of Computer Science and Information Technology’s Handbook
and policy documents with regard to plagiarism and assignment return, and also to the section of
‘Academic Integrity’ on the subject learning guide.
No extensions will be given: Penalties are applied to late assignments (5% of total assignment mark
given is deducted per day, accepted up to 5 days after the due date only). If there are circumstances that
prevent the assignment being submitted on time, an application for special consideration may be made.
See Student Handbook for details. Note that delays caused by computer downtime cannot be accepted
as a valid reason for a late submission without penalty. Students must plan their work to allow for both
scheduled and unscheduled downtime.
SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:
Task 1 should be saved to a file named task1.txt using the SPOOL command.
Task 2 should be saved to a file named task2.txt using the SPOOL command.
Task 3 should be saved to a file named task3.txt using the SPOOL command.
Note: an example of using the SPOOL command is given in the lab book. In the SPOOL file, you need
to provide the query/procedure/function/trigger execution and the sample output. For the trigger, you
need to show a sample test that demonstrates the successful execution of the trigger.
If you are not able to use SPOOL at home, please use Oracle Live SQL https://livesql.oracle.com instead
and screenshot your output into your submission file.
All the tasks above are to be submitted in soft-copy format using the CSE2DBF submission link
provided on LMS by 10.00am Friday, June 5th, 2020.
SUBMISSION CHECKLIST:
✓ The relevant SQL queries for the ‘Getaway Holidays Reservation’ Database System;
✓ The required stored procedures, stored function, and triggers.
NOTE: No built-in ORACLE column numbering (such as ROWNUM) or other ORACLE
ranking facilities (such as RANK) can be used in this assignment.
Implement the following tasks using ORACLE SQL*Plus or ORACLE Live SQL.
Download the file GHRSchema.sql from the LMS site and run it on ORACLE SQL*Plus or Oracle
Live SQL. This file contains all the CREATE and INSERT statements you will need for this assignment.
If you are using ORACLE SQL*Plus:
To run the file, issue the following command: @D:\dbf\GHRSchema.sql
→ Where D:\dbf is the location of the file (for example).
If you are using ORACLE Live SQL, you can upload the script GHRSchema.sql from the below
highlighted section “My Script” and run it.
NOTE: YOU DO NOT NEED TO INSERT MORE DATA INTO THE TABLES.
The list of tables available for this assignment is the following:
CLIENT (ClientNo, Name, Sex, DOB, Address, Phone, Email, Occupation,
MaritalStatus, Spouse, Anniversary)
CCONDITION (ClientNo, Condition)
RESERVATION (ResNo, ResDate, NoOfGuests, StartDate, EndDate,
ClientNo, Status)
ACTIVITY (ActivityID, ActName, ActDescription, ActRate, RiskLevel)
OUTDOOR_ACTIVITY (ActivityID)
INDOOR_ACTIVITY (ActivityID, Location, OpeningHours)
ACCOMMODATION (RoomNo, LevelNo, AccStatus, ConnectedRoomNo,
AccTypeID)
ACCOMMODATION_TYPE (AccTypeID, AccTypeName, AccTypeRate, NoOfBeds)
EQUIPMENT (EquipmentID, EquipName, Stock, NextInspection)
SUPPLIER (BillerCode, BusinessName, ContactPerson, Phone)
SUPPLIES (EquipmentID, BillerCode)
USES_EQUIPMENT (ActivityID, EquipmentID)
CLIENT_PREFERENCE (ClientNo, ActivityID)
RESERVATION_ACCOMMODATION (ResNo, RoomNo)
ACTIVITY_SUPERVISOR (SupervisorID)
OUTDOOR_INSTRUCTOR (InstructorID, InstrName, InstrPhone,
SupervisorID)
IFIELD (InstructorID, Field)
MASSEUSE (MasseuseID, MassName, MassPhone, Area, SupervisorID)
SWIMMING_INSTRUCTOR (SwimmerID, SwimName, SwimPhone, SupervisorID)
SUPERVISION (ResNo, ActivityID, SupervisorID, Day, Time)
NOTE: PK is printed underlined and FK is printed italic in italics.
Task 1 [50 marks]
Using the tables provided above, provide SQL statements for the following queries.
a. Display the name of the client who has made the most reservations with Getaway Holidays.
b. Display the name of the client who has booked the reservation for the longest period.
c. Display the Room no, Room type, Room rate and No of guests for the reservation made by
client(s) having last name “Perez”.
d. Display the name of the outdoor instructor who has the most duties as an activity supervisor.
e. Display the reservations (reservation number and duration) whose duration is greater than the
average duration of reservations.
[10 marks each – 50%]
Hint: in SQL, if you subtract two dates, what you get is a difference in days between those dates.
Task 2 [30 marks]
Provide the implementation of the following stored procedures and function. For submission, please
include both the PL/SQL code and an execute procedure/SQL statement to demonstrate the
functionality.
a. Write a stored procedure that displays the contact details of clients who does not have any heart
conditions or Acrophobia. The resort wants to promote a new outdoor activity to them.
b. Write a stored function that uses the reservation number, activity ID, and date as input and
returns the Name of the supervisor assigned for that specific activity.
[a: 20 marks, b: 15 marks – 35%]
Task 3 [20 marks]
Provide the implementation of the following trigger. For submission, please include both the PL/SQL
code and an insert statement to demonstrate the trigger functionality.
a. A Trigger which automatically raises an error whenever a client with Aqua phobia selects
Rafting as a preferred outdoor activity.
[15 marks – 15%]

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Vellore Institute of Technology

SENSE

CSE 1002 Problem Solving and Object Oriented Programming

Assignment Marks = 10

1. Implement a Point class fro two dimensional points (x,y). Include a default constructor, a copy constructor, a negate() function to transform the point into its negative, a norm() function to return the point’s distance from the origin (0,0) and a print() function.

2. Define a Ratio class that can represent a ratio between two integers. Include necessary funstions to represent and display the ratio. Using operator overloading, overload the operator “+”, so that when, for example, the operation 2/3+4/5 is performed, the code actually performs 2/3 * 4/5. Decide all necessary data members, constructors, and other methods.

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Social Considerations

Most of the companies in the world are striving to care for social responsibilities. This has turned out to be true because they cannot exist as the sole entity because they require the input of another contributing factor to deliver their services well. One of the companies of interest is Safaricom Company. It is one of the leading communication companies in the world and deals with the dissemination and the managing of the network to facilitate communication via the mobile phones. They own the biggest share of the market and, therefore, have an appropriate management that attracts most of the people. They have a concrete plan in their running of the business to deliver the services to people. The company has experienced tremendous growth attributed to the fact that they care for the population in the community hence creating an enabling environment for them to conduct business. The company has played a significant role in ensuring the life of the people is uplifted above the standard. One of the progress it has made is sponsoring the local football clubs by financing them. This has motivated young people to join the clubs and exploit their talents and hence improving their lifestyle. The young people could have been idle but through their financing, they have been able to identify their skills. The company also has been sponsoring the bright children who are from the humble background to go through their education. This is a significant milestone in the performance of the company, and therefore, people have gained trust with it. The society we live in does not need much but require a show of appreciation to create confidence in them that we live to help each other. Safaricom has been in the forefront campaigning for quality education for all. In conclusion, the-the company has for many years catered to the society around it as the people remain to be the sole and first consideration in a business environment.

References
Reader, W. J., & Unilever. (1969). Business & society. London: Information Division, Unilever.
SelectCarroll, A. B., & Buchholtz, A. K. (2003). Business & Society: Ethics and Stakeholder Management. Mason, Ohio: Thomson/South-Western.

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